DIY Laundry “Detergent”

I feel like I need to apologize.  This post probably threw you off.  You see, I didn’t mean to do that.  It’s only THAT today, we ran out of laundry “Detergent” here at the apartment.  And, while I’m making it, I’m thinking: I should post this.  It’s cheap.  It uses less than five ingredients.  It takes less than five minutes to make.

BUT IT’S A FOOD BLOG.

What?!

Yes, it IS a food blog.  Mostly.  Theoretically.  Ok, it’s definitely a food blog.  But, this was too good to pass up.  And therefore, I apologize.

Consider that the prelude.

Ever wonder why the rest of the world calls it “Detergent” or “Soap” when it’s really a combination of both?  “Deodorant” is a similar concept.  It is both a deodorant AND anti-perspirant.  But when I need (both), I have to look for “it” (them?) in the section marked “Deodorant.”  Arg.

I started making my own Laundry “Detergent” shortly after I came to the realization that it was… cheaper.  And pretty quick #simple to make.

DIY Laundry Detergent
DIY Laundry Detergent

DIY Laundry Detergent

2 pints washing soda
2 pints borax
1/3 bar Ivory soap, zested with a ZESTER [that you plan to NEVER use for food.  Considering the danger that mixing could cause, it’s a cheap sacrifice really.]
essential oils (use one or more than one!)

Directions: Mix washing soda and borax together in a large plastic bag (think: gallon size).  Press out half of the air, seal the bag, and squeeze/mash/knead with your hands until combined.  Add soap to bag, press out half of the air, and seal the bag.  Then: squeeze, mash, knead (or another similar verb) the bag with your hands.  Now, you’re ready for the oils.  Add enough of one or a combo of a few in order to get the smell that you want.

Once you’ve achieved a good “scent,” you’re ready for washing.  It will take a little bit of trialing (fan-angling?) in order to get the results that you are looking for.  But, don’t let this throw you off.  The main concern is (which we all know) resulting in clean clothes without a suds residue.  I suggest starting with about a third of a cup of laundry detergent per regular load.  If you find that your clothes are not clean, then increase the amount to a half of a cup.  If you find that your “cleaned” clothes have a residue, decrease the amount to a quarter of a cup.  Ultimately, you want to try to use the lowest amount of detergent per laundry load that results in clean clothes without residue… which leads to saving more money.  Either way, your wallet will thank you.

DIY Laundry Detergent
DIY Laundry Detergent
DIY Laundry Detergent
DIY Laundry Detergent
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