Suffering… Uh – Succotash?

Interesting as it is, this phrase is thought to have originated during America’s depression period in the thirties and coined by Warner Brothers, the ingenuity behind the cartoon character of Sylvester the Cat.  That is, according to Wikipedia.

Apparently, Succotash began its start as a sort of boiled stew – or so “they” say at Wikipedia.  Other resources identify it more as a melange of corn and shelled beans and less as a stewed base – here and here.  In my search for THE succotash identity, I also found a complete blog post on succotash variations.

This version is all mine.  If I could classify it, I’d say it would fit more in the category of South-American-Meet #WhatIUsuallyThrowAway.

Cauliflower Greens

Yes, I included cauliflower greens.  When I originally made this, I didn’t add beans and it wasn’t called Succotash.  But then, I was making this for breakfast and wanted something a little more hearty.  And total honesty here – but, I was actually craving beans.  I love them.  My favorite are dark red kidney beans, but the grocery store here in Atlanta, Georgia degrades black beans to $0.13 less than kidney beans, so I bought those instead.

Succotash

Succotash

1/2 cup chopped sweet onion
1 Tablespoon oil (I used a Mediterranean Olive Oil Blend)
Chopped cauliflower greens, cut from 1 head of cauliflower (around 2 cups)
1 ear of fresh corn, cut from the cob (or 1 cup – canned or thawed, if frozen)
1 can black beans, drained
1/4 teaspoon chili powder
1 Tablespoon distilled white vinegar
salt and pepper, to taste

Directions: place a large skillet over medium heat.  Add oil and onion.  Sauté until tender.  Add greens to pan and sauté until tender.  Next, add beans, corn, and chili powder to pan.  Continue cooking until heated through and corn is tender.  Remove from heat.  Stir in white vinegar and season with salt and pepper.  Makes: 4 side servings
Succotash

Succotash

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5 thoughts on “Suffering… Uh – Succotash?

  1. Beans are my favourite things too! I swear I can just eat plain old boiled chickpeas or whatever legumes all day. It’s like they have their own package of seasoning! Have you tried sprouting your beans for maximum nutritional benefits? I’m currently soaking quinoa to sprouts for the first time : ) Iz

    1. yes, I sprout – but so far, it’s only been beans; I even made a post for it here: https://lifeatthecircle.wordpress.com/2013/07/02/diy-homemade-sprouts/

      I really want to sprout grains next, but I haven’t tried sprouting quinoa! Is it the same process?

      I’m currently on the road with my husband – so sprouting is hard to do right now and I’m relying on canned beans (womp, womp), but once we arrive at our destination in Colorado, we’ll be there for a month, so I’ll get to sprout again.

  2. Basically the same! You might need to rinse in shorter intervals though, i.e..six hours. And yes, you mentioned you were going travelling which would muck up your running training 😛 canned beans are so nice and convenient! I only wish they were a bit more natural! I wish they sell freshly canned beans in the supermarket or something! Bean salads are similar but they haven’t got that mushiness! I’d say sprouting is a pretty convenient way to prepare beans though, since after that they don’t require a laborious amount of cooking time 🙂 here’s the website with instructions on quinoa sprouting http://www.healyrealfoodvegetarian.com/how-to-sprout-quinoa/ (quinoa keeps autocorrecting to wimps on my tablet !)

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